Kayak paddle

A kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double blade paddle. The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. Their cockpit is sometimes covered by a spraydeck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray and makes it possible for highly skilled and specially trained kayakers, to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler. In modern kayaks, such recovery methods have been replaced by a preventive approach based on increasing the kayak's stability, and by that reducing the likelihood of its capsize. Many modern kayaks have modified the traditional design in various ways, such as: eliminating the cockpit by seating the paddler on top of the boat ; having inflated air chambers surrounding the boat; replacing the single hull by twin hulls, and replacing paddles with other human powered propulsion methods, such as foot-powered rotational propellers and 'flippers'. Kayaks are also being sailed, as well as propelled by means of small electric motors, and even by outboard gas engines, when possible.
The paddle is held with two hands, some distance apart from each other. For normal use, it is drawn through the water from front (bow) to back (stern) to drive the boat forwards. The two blades of a kayak paddle are dipped alternately on either side of the kayak. A paddle is distinguished from an oar in that the paddle is held in the user's hands and completely supported by the paddler, whereas an oar is primarily supported by the boat. Gloves may be worn to prevent blistering for long periods of paddling.
Dragon Boat Paddle
Dragon Boat Paddle
Dragon Boat Steering Paddle
Dragon Boat Steering Paddle